THE SCARR: Animalenemy CD. Mint condition. Tristania members. Type O Negative similarities. “Every Breath You Take” The Police cover!

£3.66

In stock

Description

Mint condition.

Tracklist
1. Holy Wars 03:39
2. Burning Already 04:10
3. Every Breath You Take 02:59 [The Police cover]
4. You’re Not God 04:48
5. Dies 04:57
6. Fucked Up, Smashed and Glorious 03:52
7. Biblical Tongue 04:10
8. Stillborn 04:42
9. Lies 04:11
10. Animalenemy 04:34
Total playing time 42:06    FULL AUDIOhttp://force.heavy-music.ru/online.php?&band=The%20Scarr&album=(2001)%20-%20Animalenemy

A trip through WTF city.
This has got to be the strangest album I’ve ever heard in my life, pure and simple. It is a pure testament to how the label Gothic metal could mean pretty much anything. You’ve got classic rock, punk, thrash, techno, and death metal elements all thrown together into a stew that will likely shock the taste buds. Pete Johansen must have either been in the midst of some kind of personal crisis or just stoned out of his mind to have concocted something that is this musically beautiful and twisted all at the same time. I am somewhat at a loss for how to rate this as I still have mixed feelings towards it after owning it for a couple of years, but I will do my best to explain exactly what I hear when I put this album on.

First the obvious part, Pete Johansen vocal register is not all that far from how low Peter Steele from Type O Negative occasionally goes when he wants to make some chick in the audience orgasm from the vibrations of the speakers.

Like with his various works with Tristania, Sirenia, and The Sins of thy Beloved, there are moments of musical brilliance where Pete plays the violin. These moments are sparsely placed, often lasting 10 to 20 seconds, but nonetheless mesmerising. Dies, You’re not God, and Holy Wars are the best examples of Pete’s flair for expressing a lot of emotion in a few quick passes with his bow, but a few others can be found here and there on what is otherwise an almost completely mechanical sounding mixture of electronic sounds.

Ultimately, if you are a big fan of Type O Negative and Tristania during the Veland years, there are some similarities to be found on here.

Once again, here I am confronted with a difficulty of the first order: to speak to you of a totally unknown group which did not provide me any info and whose website does not contain any indication on its nature, its composition or even its creation . By carefully examining the lean booklet, I have the impression that The Scarr is the work of a single man: a certain Pete Johansen who is accompanied by a few musical temps. While the only Johansen I know is trailing his second division slates in a football club that is dear to me, he is a famous unknown … It even seems that tours with Morgul, The Sins Of Thy Beloved or Tristania were made recently. Well, at the limit, we do not care. The essential remains well and truly the music.

Quite close in its melodic construction of HIM, To / Die / For or Evereve, The Scarr stands out with its downright industrial intonations. It sounds like Trent Reznor is trying to hang on to the TOP 50, especially on “You’re not God” or “Holy wars”. The HIM influence is also felt in the vocals of songs like “Dies” or “Stillborn” while “Fucked up, smashed and glorious” is more aggressive with a chorus however very catchy. In addition, a revival of the splendid police standard “Every breath you take” gives a youthful look in this respect by torturing multiple effects. In any case it is obvious that the design of this disc was made for a single purpose: never give the impression of reusing the same piece twice in a row. The variety of titles is such that the investment can be profitable provided that sometimes accept a little saturation in the vocals and alternating styles sometimes disconcerting. The arrival of formations like The Scarr is however beneficial to the scene because they possess the necessary talent to make HIM bis but they try to stand out clearly by making their own sauce, at the risk of never being able to break through. And just for that, they deserved applause … The arrival of bands like The Scarr is however beneficial to the scene because they have the talent to make HIM bis but they try to stand out by making their own sauce, at the risk of never being able to break through. And just for that, they deserved applause … The arrival of bands like The Scarr is however beneficial to the scene because they have the talent to make HIM bis but they try to stand out by making their own sauce, at the risk of never being able to break through. And just for that, they deserved applause …