VOX TEMPUS: In The Eye Of Time CD (Original copy) prog rock / hard rock / A.O.R. Strong vocals + Gregg Bissonette (drums)

VOX TEMPUS: In The Eye Of Time CD (Original copy) prog rock / hard rock / A.O.R. Strong vocals + Gregg Bissonette (drums). Check audio

£11.50

In stock

Description

Full-length, Progman Records
2004

1. For Every Life 06:17
2. Escape 05:24
3. Broken 04:20
4. Foreshadows 02:16
5. Revelations 07:33
6. What About 07:41
7. Voice of Time 05:52
8. Love, Lies and Treason 13:39
9. Steal the Moment 04:20
Total playing time 57:22

 

5.0 out of 5 stars Melodic progressive hard rock,
Originally released in 2004, (THIS IS AN ORIGINAL COPY) In the Eye of Time was the debut offering from U.S. melodic progressive rockers Vox Tempus. After the dissolution of the band Equinox, guitarist Ray Mantor, bassist Jim Turba and keyboardist Eric Ragno recruited vocalist Dan Reed and reintroduced themselves as Vox Tempus. Making a guest appearance on drums for In the Eye of Time is none other than former David Lee Roth drummer Gregg Bissonette.

Vox Tempuss sound is hard to pin down. The band draws from progressive rock and metal, melodic rock and AOR, the result of which is a meeting point between mellower Dream Theater and post-Fish Marillion, or perhaps Circus Maximus meets Saga. Actually, with their captivating melodies, technical prowess, and less metallic approach they remind me a lot of Enchant.

I’m not sure if In the Eye of Time really qualifies as a metal album, but it definitely has its heavier moments (“Escape”, “Revelations”). Its progressive in terms of the individual instrumental performances as well as the song structures, but never goes too far into self-indulgent, prog for progs sake soloing. Of course, when you have compelling melodies and engaging songs like these, you don’t need to hide behind 15-minute instrumental jams. Mantor and Turba establish the progressive foundation, but its Ragno and Reed who cement the albums melodic rock credentials. Ragno has contributed to several AOR acts (most notably Takara and Ramos/Hugo) and his keyboard work here brings a degree of melodic rock polish. Reed has the kind of voice thats crystal clear and cuts like a knife. Hes a great fit for this kind of music, but at the same time I could totally see him belting out Journey-style arena rock ballads. Progressive and/or melodic rock fans should find Vox Tempus quite enjoyable.