GODFLESH: Messiah CD See VIDEO. Best band in their field industrial Metal / noise rock Check samples. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

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Description

Messiah is an EP by industrial metal band Godflesh. The songs on this EP were originally recorded and mixed during 1994, and released only to members of the band’s fan club. After Justin Broadrick disbanded Godflesh, he re-released the material, along with four remixes, which were created in 1995.

Track listing:
“”Messiah”” -“ 6:29
“”Wilderness of Mirrors”” -“ 5:56
“”Sungod”” -“ 6:23
“”Scapegoat”” -“ 3:54
“”Messiah”” (dub) -“ 6:35
“”Wilderness of Mirrors”” (dub) -“ 6:08
“”Sungod”” (dub) -“ 6:28
“”Scapegoat”” (dub) -“ 8:53

Length 50:51

Personnel:
G. C. Green -“ bass
J. K. Broadrick -“ guitar, vocals
Machines -“ rhythm, samples, synth

Released 2003
Recorded 1994-“1995
Genre Industrial metal
Label Relapse
Producer J. K. Broadrick, G. C. Green

Originally recorded in 1994, and released on GODFLESH mastermind Justin Broadrick’s Avalanche Recordings, the highly sought-after EP was only available via the official GODFLESH website. Containing four “”lost”” tracks and ambient remixes of those same songs, ‘Messiah’ is a dark, chilling glimpse inside the mind of one of heavy music’s most revered martyrs. From the all-consuming bombast of the title track (perhaps the best song the band has ever written) through the haunting “”Wilderness of Mirrors””, to the crushing dementia of “”Sungod”” and “”Scapegoat””, ‘Messiah’ faultlessly captures the utter strength and forward-thinking vision of GODFLESH, while the record’s remixes stretch glistening, electronic skins over the original tracks’ skeletons. Relapse Records proudly resurrects ‘Messiah’, giving long-time GODFLESH worshippers a precious memento, while laying to rest this omnipotent musical beast. Barcode has punch hole.


Following the release of 2002’s indifferently received Hymns opus, industrial grindcore legends Godflesh were finally retired by their sonic architect, Justin Broadrick, who, quiet exit notwithstanding, could proudly look back upon more than a decade of committed service to the cause of extreme music. So it was especially fitting that Broadrick would then choose to lay his legendary beast to rest by unearthing one of the most collectible lost items from its past, the long-out-of-print Messiah EP. Originally made available only to members of the group’s fan club back in 1994, Messiah’s recording coincided with what most experts consider the group’s commercial and artistic peak, and featured four intensely pulverizing cuts (the title track, “”Wilderness of Mirrors,”” “”Sungod,”” “”Scapegoat””) that easily qualify as vintage Godflesh. For this reissue, four alternate versions of the same songs in dub (remixed a year later in 1995) are added for good measure, resulting in a very satisfying final adieu for longtime Godflesh fans.

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well crush my soul! – 90%
The odd thing about this release is not just the fact that it’s from the years when Godflesh had released some of their best material, yet chose not to make the original EP as widely available as possible, but just how damn good it is for a collection of “”rare and unreleased”” tracks.

A lot of bands, especially post-split, use “”rare”” tracks as an excuse to further flog the dead corpse that was their band, but not Godflesh. Besides who could really argue when it means adding this CD as a fitting epitaph to the gone but not forgotten monolith of British and international metal, Godflesh.

The first half of the cd is made up of the aforementioned “”rare”” tracks, with a remarkably surprising high standard for the first three songs.
The second half is made up by exclusive remixes done by mr Justin Broadrick himself, all in ‘dub’, and making substantial differences in terms of overall sound than the originals on the prior half.

Personally, although i can understand why it was done this way (ie costs and ease of production); putting the remixes straight after the original versions of the songs takes away some of the impact these remixes rightfully have of their own, inevitably leading to some disparaging comparisons – hence the less than perfect score on here with that being virtually the sole reason.

This would make a worthy addition to your Godflesh collection all the same, though quite why it took Relapse to release it and not Earache is beyond me.”